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ImpactGirls & Women

#SheIsEqual Mobilized Over $1 Billion for Girls and Women

Last year, Global Citizen launched a bold new campaign to fight gender inequality around the world.

Too many sexist laws prevent women from thriving economically, too many girls still miss school because of poor menstrual hygiene facilities, and too many women remain disproportionately affected by the realities of extreme poverty.

We thought, why don’t we get all those in favor of gender equality in one place, and get everyone to pitch in to make that happen?

Because we know that when a girl or woman is empowered — when She Is Equal — she can get an education, decide when to get married and start a family, get proper health care, and thrive.

The #SheIsEqual campaign kicked off in June 2018 during the European Development Days, with the objective to mobilize $500 million in commitments toward gender equality and impact the lives of 20 million women and girls. The governments of Belgium and Luxembourg, Procter & Gamble, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation joined us in the fight to see a word where She Is Equal. 

From the campaign’s launch to the #SheIsEqual Summit, and at Global Citizen Festivals in New York and Johannesburg, Global Citizens took action and campaigned alongside the likes of Reese Witherspoon, Dakota Johnson, and Michelle Obama, and partners including UN Women, UNFPA, WEConnect International, Education Cannot Wait, Uniting to Combat NTDs, the Global Financing Facility, and more. Through commitments to change made by governments and global corporations, we’re delighted to have met — and exceeded — our target.

#SheIsEqual has not only helped to drive the global narrative around women and girls in light of the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements, but has also resulted in real impact — securing 36 new commitments valued at over $1.07 billion, and set to impact the lives of more than 68 million women and girls around the world. Here’s a breakdown:

1. #LeveltheLaw: Addressing Legal Barriers to Women’s Empowerment and Participation

Five commitments, collectively worth over $12.6 million, will address legal barriers that prevent girls and women from thriving economically, with the aim to reform or repeal gender discriminatory laws that hamper women’s social and economic opportunities.

Top highlights:

Read More: Why We Need to #LevelTheLaw

2. Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights

Twelve commitments, collectively worth more than $51.9 million, are set to affect over 2.6 million women and girls’ access to sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Top highlights:

  • Belgium, Luxembourg, Norway, and Denmark made financial commitments to UNFPA Supplies to help expand access to family planning for women and adolescent girls in over 45 countries.
  • Belgium made further commitments toward sexual and reproductive health and rights for girls and women in Palestine, Morocco, Burkina Faso, Guinea, Benin, and Senegal, as well as through the SheDecides Support Unit.

“The promotion of sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls is also the fundamental right to control decisions about their own life and their own future," said Ambassador of Denmark to South Africa Tobias Elling Rehfeld.

Read More: The World's Poorest Countries Are Using More Contraception — And It Could Cut Poverty

3. Women’s Entrepreneurship and Financial Independence

Three commitments will collectively mobilize $230 million in corporate spend to purchase and source goods and services from women-owned enterprises.

Top highlights:

  • WEConnect International corporate members Accenture, Intel, and Procter & Gamble committed to increase their procurement from women-owned businesses in South Africa and globally at the SDG High Level Reception in Johannesburg.

“We cannot achieve the Global Goals without the involvement of corporates, [and] we know that there is no greater empowerment than the empowerment of women," said Zandile Njamela of Accenture.