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Captain Tom Moore at his home in Marston Moretaine, Bedfordshire, England on April 16, 2020. The British army veteran who walked the length of his garden 100 times to raise funds for the National Health Service is to be honored with a knighthood.
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Britain Mourns a Hero: 10 Beautiful Tributes to Captain Sir Tom Moore as He Dies Aged 100

Why Global Citizens Should Care
The UN’s Global Goal 3 focuses on good health and well-being. The work of the man known affectionately to millions as Captain Tom serves as an inspirational story of individual action and sacrifice to fight for the good of the whole. It’s imperative we honour his memory and carry his wonderful legacy forward, and end COVID-19 for everyone, everywhere. Take action here to join the movement.

Today a nation mourns a hero.

Captain Sir Tom Moore, the centenarian who raised £33 million for the NHS during the first UK COVID-19 lockdown, passed away peacefully on Tuesday at Bedford Hospital after testing positive for coronavirus.

Moore won the hearts of Britain and the world after he walked 100 laps of his garden ahead of his 100th birthday in April 2020. He first set out to raise £1,000 for NHS Charities, a group of nonprofits that work to support patients and staff affected by the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

But after hitting £70,000 in 24 hours, he kept going. Moore completed another 100 laps, and raised £32,796,155, according to his JustGiving page.

The rest is history. In May, he was given a special nomination for a knighthood. His life is a spectacular story about hope — and how the action of one individual can release a tidal wave of change and light at a time of such unparalleled darkness.

Moore hadn’t yet been vaccinated against COVID-19 after being on medication treating pneumonia. He tested positive for the virus last week, according to the BBC, and was hospitalised on Sunday.

"We are so grateful that we were with him during the last hours of his life; Hannah, Benjie, and Georgia by his bedside, and Lucy on FaceTime,” read a statement from his daughters. "We spent hours chatting to him, reminiscing about our childhood and our wonderful mother. We shared laughter and tears together."

“The last year of our father's life was nothing short of remarkable,” they added. “He was rejuvenated and experienced things he'd only ever dreamed of. Whilst he'd been in so many hearts for just a short time, he was an incredible father and grandfather, and he will stay alive in our hearts forever."

Even after his epic fundraising, Moore kept on taking action. The veteran started a foundation to combat loneliness, support hospices, and to help those facing bereavement — and published two books to support it. He even became the oldest chart-topper ever when he covered "You'll Never Walk Alone" for charity with Michael Ball.

And he inspired others to follow in his footsteps, including a 100-year-old Londoner who was awarded an OBE for raising £420,000 walking around his backyard while fasting for Ramadan.

The internet is abound with tributes right now. Here are some that we feel capture the spirit of the man who put so many others before himself — the truest, most fundamental embodiment of the UK's National Health Service there could be.