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Girls & Women

Caitlin Moran Asked Men What's Troubling Them — and the Responses Were Beautiful

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Feminism simply means gender equality, and the fight is on to release both women and men from the gnawing clutches of the patriarchy. But sometimes men get neglected from the debate — something writer Caitlin Moran is eager to change. Take action to protect the world’s poorest men and women here.

Author and journalist Caitlin Moran is best known for her comedic, insightful commentary on gender inequality — especially when it comes to the modern realities of life being female.

In her 2011 bestseller How to Be a Woman, she called for fifth-wave feminism that — rather than internalising, denouncing, or squabbling with the “bullshit of being a modern woman” — would point and laugh at it instead.

But on Thursday she changed tack, calling on the “Men of Twitter” to discover what kind of issues they’ve been dealing with lately.

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Feminism is essentially about equality between men and women — and according to some of the guys that responded to her, it appears that men can be equally affected by the patriarchal world we live in, especially when it comes down to being “mocked for enjoying a sit down wee.”

Moran has since received thousands of responses from men and women around the world.

And examining the thread, the stories that were shared ranged from hilarious — the single most-retweeted answer was simply “Piers Morgan” — to the downright beautiful.

In 2015, a Stylist poll crowned Caitlin Moran the funniest woman on Twitter — and in 2014 her Twitter feed was even added to the A-level English language and literature curriculum.

Well, the Department of Education probably needs to update its textbooks, because this thread is definitely worth studying.

In fact, Moran thought the conversation was so important that within hours she had set up a new Facebook group called The Decent Fellows’ Society to provide another platform for men to talk about their concerns.

The group already has 1,000 members and is discussing everything from road rage to Twitter's favourite gendered oversight: flowers.

The stories and replies continue to flood in — and judging by what men have been saying, we would wager that flower sales might be about to bloom.