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The Heartbreaking Photos of What's Really Happening in Puerto Rico

Luis Cosme poses sitting in an armchair in what is left of his house destroyed by Hurricane Maria, in Morovis, Puerto Rico, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. Cosme, a worker at a cleaning company, felt the high winds and ran to the shelter at the Catholic church building. In the morning he came out and saw his house gone. "Thank God I am alive" he said.
Ramon Espinosa/AP

The crisis in Puerto Rico is not over yet. 

Nearly two weeks after Hurricane Maria, a category four storm, tore through Puerto Rico forging a path of devastation and destruction, many of the island’s citizens still do not have access to food, water, medicine, or electricity. 

Gov. Ricardo Rosselló of Puerto Rico said it could take between four and six months for power to be fully restored in the US territory, which is home to 3.4 million people.

Read more: Puerto Rico’s Crisis Is Not About ‘Broken Infrastructure.’ It’s About Poverty

As of now,, less than half the population has access to drinking water, according to CNN, and only half of the island’s roads have been cleared. Of the territory’s 69 hospitals, only 51 are open, but just nine have electricity, USA Today reported

President Donald Trump is scheduled to visit Puerto Rico on Tuesday amid calls for greater aid and a more urgent response from Washington, D.C.

The island has received some aid, but much more is needed on its long road to recovery as thousands of people’s homes and livelihoods have been severely damaged.

This is what that devastation looks like.


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Cars drive on a highway next to downed power line poles by Hurricane Maria in Vega Alta, Puerto Rico on October 1, 2017. President Donald Trump on Sunday strenuously defended US efforts to bring relief to storm-battered Puerto Rico, even as one island official said Trump was trying to gloss over 'things that are not going well,' two weeks after devastating Hurricane Maria left much of the island without electricity, fresh water or sufficient food.

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Debris is scattered around a destroyed house in the Acerolas neighborhood, in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico, on October 1, 2017.

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Sandra Alvarez, MD, from the First Medical Relief team gives Mercedes Perez a health care checkup in her apartment at the Pedro America Pagan de Colon assisted living faclity in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on October 1, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Members of the First Medical Relief team visited the complex and said the residents need water, many are hungry and need their medication which is difficult to get.

Hurricane-Maria-Puerto-Rico-Aid.jpgBlanca Rivera and Eduard Rodriguez sleep in their car to protect themselves from the elements, since their house was destroyed by Hurricane Maria, in the San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017.
Image: Ramon Espinosa/AP

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Damaged palm trees sit on a farm after Hurricane Maria in Corozal, Puerto Rico, on Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017.

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A group of homeless live under a tree next to Laguna del Condado, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 30, 2017. This group of young people during the passage of Hurricane Maria went to shelters but after a week had to return to the street. US military and emergency relief teams ramped up their aid efforts for Puerto Rico amid growing criticism of the response to the hurricanes which ripped through the Caribbean island.

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Carmen Correa uses a candle for light in her dark apartment as she and other residents of the 62 and over Moradas Las Teresas's Uno and Dos condo units deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on September 30, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Many of the elderly are having to deal with conditions such as no electricity so they can't take the elevator down from high floors nor can they get water except for a couple hours a day. Taking medication and other basic life sustaining functions have become difficult for many of the residents.

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People collect water from a water truck after Hurricane Maria in Corozal, Puerto Rico, on Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017.

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People wade into the San Lorenzo River after a bridge was swept away by Hurricane Maria in Morovis, Puerto Rico on September 30, 2017. US military and emergency relief teams ramped up their aid efforts for Puerto Rico amid growing criticism of the response to the hurricanes which ripped through the Caribbean island.

Hurricane-Maria-Puerto-Rico-Portrait.jpgFelix Davilla, who works at the Yabucoa dump, poses for a portrait in front of debris dropped off by residents in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico on Sept. 29, 2017.
Image: Gerald Herbert/AP

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People sweep mud from inside an affected business in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Comerio, Puerto Rico, September 29, 2017.

Local residents collect water from a broken pipe at an area damaged by Hurricane Maria, in Cayey, Puerto Rico, September 29, 2017.

Hurricane-Maria-Puerto-Rico-Water.jpgPeople affected by Hurricane Maria bathe in water piped from a creek in the mountains, in Naranjito, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Residents of the area drive to the pipes to bathe because they were left without water supplies by the damage.
Image: Ramon Espinosa/AP

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Javier looks the damage of his house in Yabucoa, in the east of Puerto Rico, on September 28, 2017.

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Hurricane survivors receive food and water being given out by volunteers and municipal police as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on September 28, 2017 in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico.

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Maria Martinez stands next to her house which was damaged by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa in eastern Puerto Rico on September 28, 2017.

Hurricane-Maria-Puerto-Rico-Aftermath.jpgDestroyed communities are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017.
Image: Gerald Herbert/AP

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Hector Ojeda and Sonia Robles and Tony Ojeda cross a river on foot after the bridge was washed away when Hurricane Maria passed through on September 27, 2017 in Morovis, Puerto Rico.

Hurricane-Maria-Puerto-Rico-Power.jpgEvan Mandino, right, sits with neighbors on a couch outside their destroyed homes as sun sets in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017.
Image: Gerald Herbert/AP