About Wei Jie Chen

Wei Jie Chen is a Digital Content Intern at Global Citizen. As an Ethnic Studies major at Hampshire College, he wrote a thesis on the labor and political history of Manhattan’s Chinatown and the experience of second-class citizenship. Wei is a native New Yorker born in Queens and raised in Brooklyn with a passion for documenting the socioeconomic realities of urban life, critiquing culture, and re-imagining political praxis. He watches foreign language films and listens to underground hip hop.

Why Wei Jie Chen is a Global Citizen

I am global citizen because I believe that we need to think critically about what it means to be a citizen today before we can effectively engage in eradicating structural inequalities.

Stories

  1. Article: The global flow of coffee
    Food & Hunger

    The global flow of coffee

    By Wei Jie Chen|Nov. 15, 2015

    9 reflections on Coffee, the second most traded commodity in the world. Read more

  2. Video: How Mr. Toilet is ending poo taboos in India
    Water & Sanitation

    How Mr. Toilet is ending poo taboos in India

    By Wei Jie Chen|Nov. 12, 2015

    2.5 billion people are without toilets and access to safe sanitation. Read more

  3. Video: How 18 cents could save a life
    Health

    How 18 cents could save a life

    By Wei Jie Chen|Nov. 6, 2015|TakePart

    Guaranteeing a child won't get sick can cost as little as 18 cents. Read more

  4. Article: Grace Lee Boggs' vision and legacy in post-industrial America
    Citizenship

    Grace Lee Boggs' vision and legacy in post-industrial America

    By Wei Jie Chen|Oct. 29, 2015

    Grace Lee Boggs' activism spanned seven decades and reimagined working class communities in America. Read more

  5. Video: How Ericsson restored Internet in Nepal
    Citizenship

    How Ericsson restored Internet in Nepal

    By Wei Jie Chen|Oct. 9, 2015|Ericsson

    Technology plays a crucial role in rebuilding post-earthquake Nepal. Read more

  6. Article: “The Missing 43” and the question of surveillance
    Citizenship

    “The Missing 43” and the question of surveillance

    By Wei Jie Chen|Oct. 1, 2015

    Lack of information on the 43 missing students continues to incite outrage on its first anniversary. Read more