“It is the people who have done the least to cause climate breakdown who are hit the hardest.” — Greta Thunberg, 16-year-old activist.

Droughts, storms and floods — the effects of climate change are visible worldwide. And for the poor, these are already a great threat to lives and livelihoods. By 2030 an additional 100 million people could be driven into extreme poverty by climate change alone. Most of them are expected to live in Sub-Saharan Africa, where a quarter of all malnourished people already live today.

The consequences? Extreme and unpredictable weather conditions lead to natural disasters depriving farmers of their livelihoods, destroying crops, and causing famines.

It’s predicted that countries in Sub-Saharan Africa will suffer harvest losses of more than 20% in coming decades, although we actually need more food in the long run to feed all people. In some areas even half of the harvest could fall victim to drought — an almost unimaginable loss.

Time is running out. It’s essential that the communities who will be most affected by climate change are supported to survive the impact. Organisations like the Consultative Group on International Agriculture Research (CGIAR) are leading the effort to provide innovative solutions, including data collection and harvest and drought planning, helping people worldwide to feel more secure in the knowledge from where their next meal will come.

Add your name: urge politicians worldwide to help farmers in low-income countries to adapt to the consequences of climate change.